Wednesday, 10 October 2018 00:00

Hunstanton

Written by  Joe Lenton
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Hunstanton

We are fortunate enough to have both east-facing and west-facing beaches in Norfolk. So, you can see the sun rise out to see from one side of the county and set over the sea on the other. Hunstanton is in the northwest of Norfolk and it is a great location for landscape photographers, especially around sunset.

It is a very varied stretch of the coast with "Old Hunstanton" being most well known for its iconic cliffs. The cliffs are made up of different layers of different colours of stone/earth. They can be found in the northern part of Hunstanton with ample parking available near the lighthouse.

When photographing landmarks such as the Hunstanton cliffs, there are many possibilities available. You can go extremely wide to show more of the landscape, or you can make more of a feature of them by going in closer.

Help the viewer to understand the scale of landmarks by including something to show the size, such as people on the beach.

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At low tide, especially if the tide has only just gone out, you are often left with puddles of water on the beach that can be used for interesting reflections. You may need experiment with angles by getting down low and close to the puddles to get something you want reflected there (e.g. clouds).

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Nearby you can also find a rather interesting rocky area. The rocks are generally very smooth like giant pebbles lodged in the sand. They can look like an alien landscape and fuel the imagination. Look for opportunities to make the scene more ethereal by using long exposures to blur the waves or to go for an almost still appearance as in the image above.

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"New Hunstanton" (further south along the coast) is more well known for its groynes and modern seaside amenities. As with the sea defences elsewhere, Hunstanton's are quite distinctive and are very useful anchor points for composing photos. Try shooting from the promenade to get an elevated view of the groynes as well as down on the beach.

hunstantonjoe.jpgAs well as very long exposures, try different shutter speeds to alter the appearance of the water. See if you can make the most of the sea snaking its way around the groynes and breaking on the defences.

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Although you lose some of the distinctive shape of the sea defences, it is also worth shooting along the coast, especially to make the most of the warm light of sunset.

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With a longer (telephoto) lens you can pick out details for slightly more abstract compositions. If you are into wildlife photography then you should have a long lens with you as there are many sea birds to be seen scurrying around the sand and circling above the sea and cliffs.

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There is plenty of parking down this end of Hunstanton in the pay and display zones. If you visit outside of the main season you can sometimes find free parking on the main coastal road. There are places to eat nearby, so you can enjoy sunset and then a meal (or vice versa!). Hunstanton proves that west Norfolk also has plenty to offer even if it isn't as well known as the east.

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© Joe Lenton, October 2018

Joe Lenton is a professional photography tutor and commercial photographer. He has won over 50 international awards for his images and been featured in exhibitions around the world. He runs photography workshops and teaches various aspects of photography and images processing one to one . For more free photography tips and to enquire about photography training please visit Original Art Photography .

Last modified on Sunday, 13 January 2019 15:33

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