Wednesday, 04 July 2018 00:00

NNDC is helping Colby Primary School to go for eco gold

Written by  Abigail Sanders
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NNDC is helping Colby Primary School to go for eco gold

Colby Primary School are active participants in the Eco-Schools project, a global programme which is part of Keep Britain Tidy. The school has an Eco Council made up of ten pupils of different ages who campaign within the school to make other pupils aware of environmental issues that affect themselves, their school and their local area.

The school is consistently striving to improve its eco credentials further. In order to improve on one of their objectives, clearing litter, the school approached North Norfolk District Council (NNDC) to ask for some new litter pickers as they aspire to keep the school grounds and surrounding area tidy and free of litter. NNDC donated the junior litter pickers to the Eco Council at the school on 28 June.

Armed with their ten new litter pickers from NNDC the children have plans to clean up their local parks, near their homes and at beaches as part of their annual Eco Week. NNDC’s donation of litter pickers has meant that more children can carry out supervised litter picks at the same time.

Colby Primary School currently holds a Silver award from the Eco-Schools project, the next step for them is to achieve its Gold Award.

Sarah Cox, the Chair of Colby Primary School’s Parent Teacher Association, is a passionate environmentalist and has led a number of innovative projects at Colby Primary School. Sarah was awarded the Norwich and Norfolk Eco Hero Award for the eco work she does at the school. 

“I was so pleased to receive the award for the eco work that I do at Colby Primary School but see the award as recognition of the work we do at the school as a collective effort. It has certainly inspired me to do even more and hopefully made the children realise how important their eco work is.”

Christine Mead, Headteacher at Colby Primary School, said: “Colby children are committed to protecting the environment and are enthusiastic litter pickers!  We are very grateful to NNDC for providing us with equipment which will enable us to keep our school grounds tidy.  We also look forward to getting out into the local community to litter pick and spread our environmental message.”

NNDC is very proud to support the school and the initiative, especially the ethos of the Eco-Schools programme to encourage closer links between the school and their community.

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Read 538 times Last modified on Sunday, 06 January 2019 11:03

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