Tuesday, 27 June 2017 00:00

NNDC works with communities to carry out more than 100 litter-picks in one year

Written by  Pascale Palmer
Rate this item
(0 votes)
Sheringham Community Primary School’s Eco Group with NNDC Environmental Services Officer Richard Crabb (left) Sheringham Community Primary School’s Eco Group with NNDC Environmental Services Officer Richard Crabb (left)

In the past year NNDC’s Environmental Services Team has supported 107 community litter collection events, helping keep our beaches, towns and villages clear of rubbish.

The Council support came in the form of rubbish bags, bin bag hoops and litter pickers loaned to local groups, as well as picking up the litter that is collected for free.

In 2016 NNDC worked with schools and local groups from across the district to help them look after the environment, and helped North Norfolk join in the Great British Spring Clean and Clean for the Queen campaigns.

Cllr Annie Claussen-Reynolds Cabinet Member for Environmental Services said: “We know a lot of our residents are passionate about keeping North Norfolk a beautiful place and it’s only right that we are able to offer them appropriate assistance in ways such as this. 

“Litter can be such a blight on our landscape and in our seas, and a dangerous threat to wildlife. Helping hundreds of people keep our beaches and villages free of litter is something North Norfolk District Council is very pleased to be able to support.” 

In 2016 NNDC helped Sheringham Community Primary School’s Eco Group by supplying them with 10 litter-pickers and 10 bin bag hoops.

Head teacher Sue Brady said: “The work the Council is doing on encouraging litter picking and educating people in why it’s so important is great. Our Eco Group has gone from strength to strength and the equipment donated by NNDC has helped us no end.”  

The Council has also supplied litter picking equipment for the two-minute litter pick station at Mundesley.  Beach visitors can collect a litter picker and bag on their way onto the beach and pick up any litter they may come across.  The bag of litter can then be placed in one of the litter bins and the picker returned for the next user. 

NNDC’s Environmental Team has recently started working with a Youth Offending programme and the Probation Service to coordinate community litter picking and general amenity work across our communities.

The Community Payback programme is a scheme which punishes offenders for their crimes and allows them to make amends in their local communities by carrying out unpaid work on local projects such as tidying public spaces and removing litter.  In North Norfolk, offenders will be litter-picking some of the more remote beaches not routinely covered by the Council’s cleaning teams, to ensure the whole North Norfolk coastline is as free from litter as it can be. 

Last modified on Tuesday, 27 June 2017 19:53

Related items

  • Latest annual figures demonstrate crucial importance of tourism to North Norfolk

    The latest set of figures detailing how important the tourism sector is to North Norfolk has painted a clear picture of many more overnight stays and a £10m boost to the economy year on year.

    The Economic Impact of Tourism report for 2017, published this week, has revealed the following:

    • ·The total number of trips (day & staying) to North Norfolk was 8,827,700.
    • ·Of these, 8,207,000 were day trips (up 5.8% from a 2016 total of 7,755,000).
    • ·And 620,700 were ‘staying’ or overnight trips (up 12.1% from a 2016 total of 553,500).
    • ·This gives a total tourism value of £505m (up 3% from a 2016 total of £495m).
    • ·In 2017 there were 11,352 actual tourism jobs (or 8,184 full time equivalent jobs). This is an increase of 3% compared to 2016.

    The 2017 figures also compare well with overall growth in England – the 12.1% increase in the number of overnight trips to North Norfolk is against a background of a 3% increase in the same statistic across England as a whole.

  • Second GoGoHare becomes a permanent citizen of North Norfolk

    North Norfolk has become the full-time home of two of the fabulous GoGoHares who have taken the region by storm.

    A Hare Through the Seasons, who has proven to be a star attraction at the sensory garden in Holt Country Park, is to be joined as a permanent North Norfolk resident by Lepus, who has been wowing residents and visitors in North Walsham over the summer.

    North Norfolk District Council (NNDC) originally agreed to buy A Hare Through the Seasons and to sponsor Lepus. But following widespread support for Lepus, the council will now be purchasing both hares outright so they can continue as attractions in their respective locations and act as permanent advertisements of the great work of Break, which is the charity behind the GoGoHare.

    It means Lepus will now not be moved following the forthcoming GoGoHares public auction.  

  • Bradfield Cricket Club opens new clubhouse with ‘Big Society’ help

    Bradfield Cricket Club had a special guest last Saturday (August 18 2018) before their league match against Horsford; North Norfolk District Council (NNDC) Leader, Councillor John Lee, was on hand to present the Club with a plaque celebrating the Council’s £15,000 grant from its Big Society Fund.

    This was the first serious fixture at the ground since Bradfield opened their refurbished clubhouse on August 4; part of a £120,000 project to secure cricket at one of the best grounds in Norfolk.

    The new clubhouse, on the edge of the pitch which Bradfield have played on since 1845 now boasts new changing facilities, toilets, kitchen, bar and social area, which together will provide better facilities, especially for children’s cricket at the Club.

    North Norfolk District Council has run the Big Society Fund for six years now and it has benefitted many community groups across the District, with over £1.6m being handed out to 219 community projects in that time.

  • Meet the latest recruits helping to shape the future of some of Norfolk’s green spaces

    Pensthorpe Natural Park, near Fakenham, has unveiled the team of young nature-lovers who have been selected to help the reserve motivate the next generation to connect with nature and look after the environment. 

    The 12-strong group, aged between nine and 11, are the latest recruits for Pensthorpe’s Junior Board, an initiative which has been in place since 2015 to offer passionate young people an opportunity to help influence ways in which the Norfolk attraction can better engage with young people.

    The latest intake, which will be in place until June 2020, has been selected from a host of entries submitted by budding nature lovers from across the county.

  • North Norfolk food and drink businesses given chance to shine

    North Norfolk businesses are being encouraged to show off their produce at the region’s largest food and drink trade show.

    Local Flavours, which will be held at the Norfolk Showground on Wednesday, September 26, will give food and drink producers the chance to show off their wares to buyers from the hospitality, catering, food retail and tourism sectors. The buyers will be both local and from further afield, with multi-national buyers as well as owners of smaller operations such as delis, farm shops and cafes.

    North Norfolk District Council is supporting the event, and food and drink businesses based in the district that have not previously exhibited at Local Flavours can enjoy a discount if they take a stand.