Friday, 31 March 2017 00:00

From Cumbria to Cromer, goat herd size to double

Written by  Ed Foss
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From Cumbria to Cromer, goat herd size to double

A herd of eight Bagot goats have been moved back into their spring and summer residence on Cromer’s cliff. The goats have been clearing land in recent months at Happy Valley. Their move back into the heart of Cromer was made today thanks to NNDC officers.

The Bagot billies, which have appeared on television and in newspapers, will be joined by another eight Bagots from Cumbria sometime in May.

In order to make adequate space for the expanded herd, the size of their enclosure will be more than doubled when new fencing is installed to the west of the current enclosure. The enclosure currently stops at the white steps above the promenade, but will be extended to the zig zag steps.

Cllr Angie Fitch-Tillett Cabinet Member for Environmental Services said: “Last year the goats were very popular with visitors, but also did a fabulous job at managing the habitat. It is excellent news that there will be an addition to the herd later in the year, which means an extra attraction for our visitors but also an extended area which will be naturally managed by these brilliant undergrowth clearing machines.”

In the past the cliff area has become overgrown, leading to a problem with litter embedded and snagged in bushes. The Bagot goats graze on rough materials rather than grass and therefore last year kept plant growth over the area under control.

The Bagot is believed to be Britain’s oldest breed of goat and unlike most other breeds - that favour mountains and uplands - it developed in the English lowlands. Bagots are very hardy and easy to tame.

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Last modified on Friday, 31 March 2017 21:47

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